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IT'S HOW YOU MOVE - Part 5

Becoming fit helps you come a lot closer to looking and feeling like the person you want to be.

Just eating less won't do it. “Everybody talks weight loss, but what you really want is a change in body composition, meaning less fat and preferably more muscle,” says nutritionist Lisa Powell, who believes it is a mistake to focus only on calories. “If you are a large, pear-shaped body and you diet and lose weight, you're going to be a small pear-shaped body. If you don't like your shape, you need to exercise if you want it to be fit and lean.”

If you don't like your shape, you need to exercise if you want it to be fit and lean. — Lisa Powell

Canyon Ranch's Christie Hefner nicely summarizes my goal for both myself and my girls. “Your appearance should reflect you as a healthy person. That means that you're physically active and that you eat well, which I think are good areas of concern for girls, boys, men, and women, versus insecurities having to do with 'I don't look like that model' or 'I weigh too much.'”

Your appearance should reflect you as a healthy person. That means that you're physically active and that you eat well. — Christie Hefner

Christie does Pilates regularly, works out at the gym, and loves to play tennis, ride her bike, and ski. “I've always paid a lot of attention to wanting to feel and look healthy, so I have been active in sports all my life. I was raised to eat healthy, and it was something I focused on.”

She believes that magazines and other media need to show more images of vigorous women. When she was head of Playboy, she presided over a gradual change in the look of the women who appeared on the magazine's pages. “For many of the early years, you would never have seen athletic women in the magazine,” she recalls. “That changed, not just in the appearance of women who were modeling in the magazine but in the appearance of actual athletes like Gabrielle Reece, a volleyball player, or Katarina Witt, the skater. We featured women with strong physiques, and they were both powerful and sexy.”

Those kinds of images help to shift attitudes about what we consider beautiful and encourage the next generation of girls to value exercise. For some older women who did not grow up playing sports, and never developed the habit of exercising, it's harder to get started.

Maggie Murphy of Parade magazine was in high school in 1972 when Congress passed Title IX to ensure that girls have the same opportunities to play sports as boys do. “Team sports were not part of my era.

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