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Overcoming Cross-Sightedness and Lazy Eye - Part 11

Draw a red circle on the white sheet of paper. Hold the paper out in front of you with one hand so that the paper is parallel to the ground, about a foot in front of your eyes. Turn the flashlight on and put it underneath the paper, shining the light up through it. Look down at the circle while shining the light up through the page. You should see the circle and also the light.

Now close your red-filtered eye. The eye that looks through the green filter should see the circle but not the light, because the red light cannot penetrate through the green lens. On the other hand, the green filter does not stop you from seeing the red circle.

Conversely, if you close the eye that looks through the green, and only look through the red lens, you will see the light, but you will not see the red circle. The eye with the green filter will only see the object, and the eye with the red filter will only see the light. This kind of division is very important because you see a separate image from the eye with the red filter and the eye with the green filter simultaneously.

Now move the light, which is underneath the page, around the perimeter of the circle, like you are tracing around its edge. If your eyes can track together, you will be able to keep the light on the edge of the circle. If your eyes cannot track together, though you may think that the light is on the edge of the circle, it will actually be elsewhere. In my case, when I thought that the light was on the circle, the light was actually outside or inside the circle. So, a way for you to know what's happening with your light is to suddenly close the eye with the green filter; when you do this, you will see exactly where the light is. When you open the eye with the green filter, you will see if the light remains exactly where it was when that eye was closed, or if it moved. Even if it moved, don't correct it. Close your eye with the green lens and open it ten to twenty times or until the light remains in the same place as it does when you look at the light through the red lens alone. Once it stays in the same place, it means that your eyes are tracking. For it doesn't matter if it's in the circle or out; what matters is that the two eyes are looking together at the same spot.

You may find yourself needing to palm in the middle of this exercise. Palm for as long as necessary to help you relax enough to return to the exercise.

Overcoming Cross-Sightedness and Lazy Eye

Figure 5.6. Turn the flashlight on and put it underneath the paper, shining the light up through it.

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